Coal Mining Fatalities in Grundy County Illinois

The following men have died in a variety of mining accidents in the coal mines of Grundy County Illinois. Biographic details of their accident are included in each report.

Dominico Ariano

July 16 Dominico Ariano, a miner, 24 years of age, was instantly killed by a fall of rock at the face of his room. The cause of the accident was evidently due to incompetency or carelessness. On examination I found the nature of the roof to be what we call good, but that the props supporting the same were entirely too far apart; where the rock fell they were nearly nine feet apart, allowing the rock an opportunity to break, which it did, throwing one prop between. The rock that fell on him would weigh over a ton; his head was crushed on a sulphur that was in the gob. He was a single man and leaves no one dependent in this country. ((1895, Big Four Coal Company’s No. 2 Mine, Coal City)) ((Fifteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1896, Containing the Thirteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1897))

John Arthur

November 9, 1906, John Arthur, miner, aged 36 years, married, was killed instantly by falling coal at the face of his working room in the mine of William Wood near Morris, Grundy county. He leaves a widow and five children. ((Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907, Also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1908))

Peter Baudena

Mar 29, 1897 – Peter Baudena, a single man, aged 40 years, employed as a miner in the Star Coal Company No. 3 mine, at Carbon Hill, in Grundy county, was instantly killed by a fall of rock at 11:45 a.m., in the first left cross-road on the east section of the mine. The deceased and his partner, Lawrence Baudena, went from the west side of the mine, where they were __ployed, to see this working place (long-wall) on the east side, occupied by John Conak and Christo Rennetto; they told the deceased the night before the accident that they were going to square up and quit their place on the ___h, and that he should come and see it, as they thought it was a better one than the one he was in on the west side. This conversation took place in the __arding house, and the deceased, without saying anything to the pit boss about it, went from his own place, or long-wall face, to see Conak and Rennetto’s place, intending if it suited him to ask the pit boss to let him work there. As he went in, Conak and Rennetto had just been pulling down rock on the face of their road, or what is called brushing, and several loose rocks were still hanging over the road. They told the decease to keep back, as the roof was dangerous. Baudena replied, as he went in, that he thought it was all right and would not fall. He wanted to go along the face to the next place Residence: Carbon Hill. ((Sixteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1897, Containing the Fourteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1898))

Charles Bendeno

September 9, 1905, Charles Bendeno, miner, aged 28 years, married, was instantly killed by falling rock at the face of his working place in the No. 3 mine of the Big Four Wilmington Coal Co., Eileen, Grundy county. He leaves a widow and one child. ((Twenty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1906, Also the Eighth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1907))

James Black

Mar 16, 1898 – James Black, a coal picker, aged 60 years and married, was caught by the cage and instantly killed, at the No. 2 mine of the Star Coal Co., Carbon Hill, Grundy county. It appears from the evidence of the cager, William Taylor, that he had belled away an empty cage for the mine manager to come down upon, and had turned away to get a car ready for the next cage, and did not see deceased on the opposite side of the shaft. It is supposed the deceased was reaching over the cage to take off a piece of coal, when the cage was taken away suddenly. Deceased was taken to the door-head and thrown back, breaking his neck. He had been warned several times to keep away from the cage. He leaves a widow and nine children, five of whom are dependent. ((Seventeenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1898, Containing the Fourteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1899))

Domonic Brido

Sept 26, 1901, Domonic Brido, miner, age 37, married, was instantly killed by a fall of rock at the face of his working place in No. 3 mine of the Big Four Coal company, Coal City, Grundy county. He was working on the right hand side of his room, when a mass of rock fell on him, killing him instantly. He leaves a widow and seven children in Italy. ((Twenty-First Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1902, Also the Fourth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1903))

Eugene Callaghan

February 19, 1900, Eugene Callaghan, driver, single, aged 21 years, was instantly killed by a fall of rock in No. 90 cross road, in the Big 4 Coal Company’s mine, Coal City, Grundy county. Deceased was riding on the grip behind the car, when a piece of rock fell on him, killing him instantly. ((Nineteenth Annual Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1900, Also the Second Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1901))

Joe Campasino

Jan 20, 1897 – Joe Campasino, a miner, aged 35 years, was instantly killed by a fall of rock in his room, long-wall, while at work in No. 3 mine of the Wilmington Star Mining Company of Coal City. The deceased and his partner, Samuel Notriann, were at work in No. 2 cross-road. A branch road had just been turned off, and between the pillar of timber and the face of the coal was a slip running parallel with the face of the coal so that the men in the branch could get their coal down. Samuel Notriann said to the deceased that the roof was dangerous looking, and thought a prop should be put in to secure it. The deceased admitted that the roof was not safe, but said he thought it would stand until he got the coal down, and he would then put a prop under it. He then started to take the coal down, and when it was taken down it cleared another slip in the roof. He turned around to come out to get a prop,bwhich was close by, but before he could get out a mass of rock of over 5,000 pounds weight fell on him and covered him completely. His partner and other miners at once tried to get him out from under the rock, but it was necessary to break it, and before they could do so he was dead. He leaves a widow and one child. Deceased was considered a careful miner, but his anxiety to get his coal out of the other men’s way was the cause of his not putting in a prop before taking down the coal. Residence: Coal City. ((Sixteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1897, Containing the Fourteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1898))

John P Carlson

Dec 4, 1901, John P Carlson, miner, age 50 years, married, was killed in the Braceville Coal company’s mine, Braceville, Grundy county. He met his death at the working face by an explosion of powder. He had drilled a hole in the coal, which passed through sulphur; when he put in the cartridge it would not pass the sulphur; he put in the drill, sharp end first, to open the cartridge, but the drill struck the sulphur and ignited the powder, with the result as stated. ((Twenty-First Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1902, Also the Fourth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1903))

Joe Conderon

Aug 25, 1896 – Joe Conderon, age 33, miner, residence Gardner, married, 1 child, cause of accident: falling of rock ((details not available, page missing)) ((Sixteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1897, Containing the Fourteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1898))

Arthur Coop

May 17, 1898 – Arthur Coop, a miner, aged 25 years and married, was fatally injured at 7:10 a.m. in the C., W. & V. Coal Co.’s “R” shaft southwest of Braidwood, Grundy county. The accident occurred about ten minutes after work commenced in the morning. Deceased and his brother, George Coop, had gone to their room, when they observed a dangerous rock near the face of their roadway, and determined to secure it before commencing work. Deceased went back on the roadway to get a timber, and as he was coming back, and about thirty feet from the face, a mass of rock fell on him, crushing his head so that he died three hours after receiving his injuries. He leaves a widow and three children, all dependent. ((Seventeenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1898, Containing the Fourteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1899))

James Corrello

James Corrello, aged 45 years, miner, employed by the Big Four Wilmington Coal Company, No. 2 shaft, near Coal City, was instantly killed by a fall of rock. He and his brother were at work mining coal in room 54 and he was getting the loose coal from the left side of the room. His brother sounded the room with his pick and said it was all right. A row of props were set along the line of the face of the room, three and one-half feet from the coal, with the cap pieces placed parallel with the line of the breakers in the roof; a slip on the edge of the props was in the roof and when the coal was taken down another slip was cleared close on the face of the coal, which continued along the face of the room for a distance of 11 feet. The deceased was passing coal to his brother, when, without warning, a large rock 11 feet long and 21 inches deep by 26 inches, fell and killed him. The placing of two props under this rock would have prevented the accident. Andrew Sloan, who was the first to go there, stated that two props would have been sufficient to sustain the roof. Deceased left a widow and three children. ((Fifteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1896, Containing the Thirteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1897))

John Corrilli

November 25, 1904, John Corrilli, pusher, age 19 years, single, was severly injured by a loaded pit car running over him in the No. 7 mine of the Wilmington Star Mining Company, Coal City, Grundy county. Deceased was in front of the car on a steep grade, but lost control of the car. He died six days after the accident occurred. ((Twenty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1905, Also the Seventh Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers; 1906))

Fred Cossatto

May 10, 1904, Fred Cassatto, miner, aged 27 years, married, was killed instantly by a fall of rock at the face of his working place, in the No. 4 mine at the Wilmington Coal Mining & Mfg. Co., Grundy county. He leaves a widow and one child. ((Twenty-Third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904, Also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1905))

Joseph Cugnatti

Mar 30, 1898 – Joseph Cugnatti, a miner, aged 60 years, single, was fatally injured at the Big 4 Wilmington Coal Co.’s mine at Coal City, Grundy county. Deceased was being hoisted out with five others, and when about thirty-five feet from the bottom he fell from the cage to the bottom of the shaft. This is a round shaft and there is about eighteen inches of space between the wall of the shaft and the platform of the cage from which he fell. Deceased died _________________________ his injuries. ((portion of page missing)) ((Seventeenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1898, Containing the Fourteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1899))

Peter Doreen

April 9, 1904, Peter Doreen, miner, aged 45 years, married, was killed instantly by a fall of rock at the face of his working place in No. 5 mine, Taylor & Cavanaugh, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. He leaves a widow and one child. ((Twenty-Third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904, Also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1905))

James Fairley

September 27, 1898 – James Fairley, a miner, aged 22 years, single, was instantly killed by a fall of rock in the Star Coal Company’s mine No. 3, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased and his partner had been taking down some rock at the face, and were in the act of cleaning it away, when, without any warning, a great mass of rock fell on him, resulting as stated. ((Prepared by the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1899, Also Containing the First Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1899))

Isaac Fawcett

February 5, 1901, Isaac Fawcett, miner, aged 28 years, single, was instantly killed by a fall of rock in the straight north entry in No. 1 mine of the Star Coal Company, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased had been brushing his roadway, and had just commenced to put in a building on the right hand side, when without warning, a large rock fell from the roof, crushing his head, with the above result. ((Twentieth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1901, Also the Third Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1902))

Joseph Feletto

June 2, 1898 – Joseph Feletto, a miner, aged 28 years, single, was fatally injured by a fall of rock at the face of his entry in the straight south entry in the Diamond No. 4 mine of the Wilmington Mining and Manufacturing Co., Grundy county. Deceased was cutting in the brushing along one side of the roadway, and had cut from one break to another close to the face, which was about three feet apart and within three inches of a smooth in the top, when suddenly without any warning a large rock weighing about 3,000 pounds fell on him, breaking his neck; he died 30 minutes after receiving his injuries. This accident was due to the victim’s own negligence; with one prop in the center of the roadway the accident would have been avoided. ((Seventeenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1898, Containing the Fourteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1899))

Victor Ferrara

Sept 12, 1903, Victor Ferrara, miner, aged 40 years, married, was killed instantly at the face of his working place, by a fall of rock, in Taylor & Cavanaugh’s No. 4 mine, located at Carbon Hill, Grundy county. He leaves a widow and one child. ((Twenty-Third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904, Also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1905))

Domnic Formea

August 16, 1904, Domnic Formea, miner, age 31 years, single, was killed instantly by a blast blowing through the pillar in the No. 3 mine of the Big Four Coal Co., Eileen, Grundy county. ((Twenty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1905, Also the Seventh Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers; 1906))

Zathan Fox

June 7, 1898 – Zathan Fox, a driver, aged 22 years, single, was fatally injured by a fall of rock in the Braceville Coal Co.’s No. 4 mine at Braceville, Grundy county. At the time of receiving his injuries he was going in with two cars, the first one being empty, the second one loaded with props. On this entry there is quite a grade down to the first right turn, in favor of the empties. He was sitting on the car of props and going at a good speed, when his light went out. The first car ran off the track at the frog, knocking out a set of timbers, which let down a large mass of rock and knocked him to one side of the car and crushed his head. He was so seriously injured that he never regained consciousness. He died two and a half hours after receiving his injuries. ((Seventeenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1898, Containing the Fourteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1899))

David Frances

March 15, 1906, David Frances, driver, aged 26 years, single, was seriously injured by being caught between the roof and a loaded car in the No. 4 mine of the Wilmington Coal Mining and Manufacturing Company, Braidwood, Grundy county. He died one week after the accident occurred. ((Twenty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1906, Also the Eighth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1907))

Peter Fresso

March 5, 1900, Peter Fresso, miner, aged 38 years, single, was fatally injured by a fall of rock in No. 3 mine of the Star Coal Company, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased and his partner had fired a shot in the brushing; he immediately returned, when a large rock fell on him, injuring him so that he died one hour after the accident occurred. ((Nineteenth Annual Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1900, Also the Second Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1901))

Samuel Fulton

January 27, 1901, Samuel Fulton, track layer, aged 35 years, married, was instantly killed by an explosion of gas in No. 6 mine of the Wilmington Star Mining Company, Coal City, Grundy county. Deceased, with four other men, went to work on Sunday morning putting in air boxes to convey the air current to the face of the workings. This is a new mine and was ventilated by a small fan at the bottom of the hoisting shaft; the large fan at the air shaft had not been placed in position. It appears from the evidence that the fan was stopped about four o’clock Saturday evening, and was not started again until after the men descended into the shaft Sunday morning. After the fan had been running about ten minutes the mine manager ordered Fulton and Paul Smith to go to the west side to lay a switch; they loaded the ____ and rails into a car and started from the bottom; when about 125 feet from the bottom they encountered fire-damp, which ignited from their open lights. Fulton was instantly killed by the explosion, and Smith was severely burned about the arms and face, but will recover. Smith testified that the mine had not been examined that morning, although the mine manager and mine examiner went down with the men, and knew that that section of the mine was generating gas. Deceased leaves a widow and five children, all dependent. ((Twentieth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1901, Also the Third Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1902))

Louis Galetti

February 28, 1905, Louis Galetti, miner, age 50 years, married, was killed instantly by falling rock at the face of his working place in the No. 5 mine of the Braceville Coal Co., Braceville, Grundy county. He leaves a widow and six children. ((Twenty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1905, Also the Seventh Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers; 1906))

Louis Gallo

June 20, 1906, Louis Gallo, miner, aged 40 years, married, had his leg broken by falling rock at the face of his working place, in the No. 7 mine of the Wilmington Star Mining Company, Coal City, Grundy county. Gallo was conveyed to his home where the physician in charge stated that his leg would have to be amputated, but Gallo would not consent to have his leg taken off. He died the next morning. ((Twenty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1906, Also the Eighth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1907))

John Gartiglio

December 28, 1906, John Gartiglio, miner, aged 42 years, single, was killed instantly by falling rock at the face of his working room in the No. 5 mine of the Wilmington Star Mining Company’s mine at Coal City, South Wilmington, Grundy county. ((Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907, Also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1908))

John Gatti

January 12, 1905, John Gatti, miner, age 45 years, single, was instantly killed by falling rock at the face of his working place in the No. 3 mine of the Big Four Coal Co., Carbon Hill, Grundy county. ((Twenty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1905, Also the Seventh Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers; 1906))

Joe Geinero

March 28, 1895, at the Big Four Company’s No. 2 mine, Coal Branch Junction, Joe Geinero, an Italian miner about 24 years of age and a single man, was found dead in the sump at the bottom of the shaft, but how he came to his death is not known. The shaft had run but a half day, quitting at noon. About 1:30 p. m., the deceased went down the shaft with Jack Strickland, the mule boss, to look for work. Strickland directed him where to find the mine boss, and also showed him the way to the escapement shaft. Mr. Strickland left him near the bottom of the shaft and went inside to attend to his work. Nothing more is known of Geinero until he was found by two men who were looking for a lamp that some one let fall in the sump in the morning. They were surprised to find the dead body of a man in the sump which is about eight feet deep. The coroner’s jury returned a verdict of accidental death. Residence: Coal City. ((Fourteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1895, Containing the Twelfth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A. Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Ed. F. Hartman, State Printer; 1896))

John Ginzzetti

October 10, 1906, John Ginzzetti, miner, aged 22 years, single, was killed instantly at the face of his working room by a falling rock in the Chicago-Wilmington and Vermilion Coal Company’s No. 1 mine, South Wilmington, Grundy county. ((Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907, Also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1908))

Patrick Greening

On July 2, 1895, at the Big Four Coal Company’s No. 2 mine, Coal City, Patrick Greening, a miner, aged 49 years, was instantly killed by a fall of coal in his room. The coal was mined under and sprags were set in front of it upon which the coal was resting. A prop was set about fifteen inches in front of the coal between the sprags. He proceeded to take down the coal by knocking out the first sprag, but the coal did not come down, so he reached past the prop and knocked out another sprag, upon which ithe coal fell suddenly, catching him between the coal and the prop, breaking his neck. He died instantly. Deceased left four children and a widow. ((Fifteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1896, Containing the Thirteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1897))

Thomas R Hughes

December 19, 1894, at Braceville No. 4 shaft, Thomas R. Hughes, a miner, 47 years of age, was fatally injured by a fall of rock on his own road, about thirty feet back from the face. His partner, Wm. Dobbs, was doing some back brushing and loading it into pit cars on his turn. He called Mr. Hughes to help him get enough rock down to load the car so that they would not lose their turn. Mr. Hughes came from the face where he was working to Mr. Dobbs’ assistance, and, taking a pick, commenced pulling down some loose rock about four feet inside of the stone that Mr. Dobbs had been cutting and sledging. As he was prying the loose stones down with his pick, he stepped back to be out of the way of the falling stone, and got directly under the rock that Mr. Dobbs had been at work upon, which fell at the same moment, knocking him down and crushing him terribly across the small of the back. He lingered for about three days and finally died of his injuries. Mr. Hughes was a married man and leaves a widow and a grandchild who were dependent upon him. Residence: Braceville. ((Fourteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1895, Containing the Twelfth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A. Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Ed. F. Hartman, State Printer; 1896))

Batiste Idvacho

Sept 14, 1896 – Batiste Idvacho, aged 35, married, wife and one child, was fatally injured by falling rock while engaged in brushing his road in the longwall workings of the Star Coal Company’s No. 2 mine at Carbon Hill, in Grundy County. He had just pushed his loaded pit-car out from the face of his room past a low place on the road, 66 feet from the face. A piece of rock was partly loose at this point and he decided to pull it down, and took his pick and sounded a larger rock just above the loose piece, and said to another miner that there was no danger of that falling, and started to cut the smaller rock from under it. He had just cut the smaller rock down to a slip on the right side of his road when, without warning, the larger rock fell and struck him on the back and left side, bearing him down on the end of his pick handle and throwing him against his loaded car. When he was removed to his home it was found that his back was broken and that he had suffered other internal injuries. He died on the 16th at 2 p.m. I found on examining this road that two slips ran from the one on the right straight across the road four feet apart and from between those slips the larger rock fell. It weighed about 1,200 pounds. Residence: Carbon Hill. ((Sixteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1897, Containing the Fourteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1898))

Andres Jenco

January 15, 1907, Andres Jenco, miner, aged 40 years, married, was seriously injured by falling rock at the face of his working room in No. 6 mine of the Braceville Coal Company, Braceville, Grundy county. He was taken to the hospital in Joliet, where he died eighteen days after the accident. He leaves a widow and one child. ((Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907, Also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1908))

John Kurasotte

November 3, 1906, John Kurasotte, driver, aged 18 years, single, was fataly injured in the No. 6 mine of the Big Four Wilmington Coal Company, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased was attempting to hold a loaded car on the down grade when his foot caught against a tie, causing him to fall in front of the car, which passed over his body. He died the following day. ((Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907, Also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1908))

John Laherty

February 11, 1901, John Laherty, miner, aged 28 years, single, was instantly killed at the face of his working room in William Wood’s mine near Morris, Grundy county. Deceased was working alone at the time and was wedging down coal, when a mass of rock fell on him with the above result. ((Twentieth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1901, Also the Third Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1902))

Eugene Lenzi

May 14, 1907, Eugene Lenzi, miner, aged 42 years, married, was severely burned by the explosion of powder in the No. 6 mine of the Braceville Coal Company, Braceville, Grundy county. Deceased was preparing to fire a shot and found his blasting barrel was clogged. After filing off a small piece of the barrel he inserted and lighted a squib, which failed to pass through the barrel. He then inserted a second squib and thought that it had passed through the barrel. After this preparation he commenced to fasten the barrel to the cartridge, when the powder ignited, burning him severely about the face and body. It is supposed that a spark was hanging fire in the barrel, which caused the powder to ignite. He was taken to the hospital in Joliet, where he died eight days after the accident. Deceased leaves a widow and five children. ((Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907, Also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1908))

Frank Lohmar

December 18, 1906, Frank Lohmar, miner, aged 34 years, married, was killed instantly by falling rock at the face of his working place in mine No. 7 of the Wilmington Star Mining Company, Coal City, Grundy county. Deceased and his partner fired a shot at quitting time of the day previous which knocked out all the props on the left hand side of their room. The next morning, instead of replacing the props, Lohmar commenced throwing out the loose coal, when a mass of rock fell on him, with the result as stated. He leaves a widow and three children. ((Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907, Also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1908))

Florent Mayhein

Jan 26, 1904, Florent Mayhein, miner, aged 44 years, married, was killed instantly by a fall of rock in his roadhead in the No. 6 mine of the Wilmington Star Mining Co., Coal City, Grundy county. He leaves a widow and three children. ((Twenty-Third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904, Also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1905))

Eldred P. Mead

Feb 12, 1902, Eldred P Mead (colored), employed as a miner, age 25 years, married, was instantly killed at the face of his working place in No. 4 mine of the Star Coal company, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased fired a shot in the coal on the right hand side of the room. He immediately returned to observe the effect of the shot, when a rock fell on him, with the result as stated. He leaves a widow and one child. ((Twenty-First Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1902, Also the Fourth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1903))

James Minyetta

June 19, 1904, James Minyetta, miner, aged 30 years, single, was fatally injured by a fall of rock in No. 6 mine of the Big Four Coal Co., Eileen, Grundy county. Deceased fired a shot in the right hand side of his place which loosened a rock. He neglected to secure it with a prop when it fell on him inflicting injuries from which he died the following day. ((Twenty-Third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904, Also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1905))

John Morraetto

September 28, 1893, John Morraetto, miner, 37 years of age, single, was instantly crushed to death by a piece of rock falling on him while at work in his room in the Star Coal Co.’s No. 3 mine at Carbon Hill, Grundy county. The deceased had just finished wedging down the under portion of this rock, when the upper part fell suddenly between the two parts, resulting as stated. Residence: Carbon Hill. ((Thirteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1894, Containing the Eleventh Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A. Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Ed. F. Hartman, State Printer; 1895))

Michael Murphy

Michael Murphy, aged 34 years, was killed by falling rock in the Braceville Coal Company’s No. 4 mine. The deceased was employed as a miner, but his room having been driven the distance required, where the cross-entry was cutting it off, stopped mining in his room on the 22nd of February, and, as there was no other room ready for him to start in just then, he asked the night boss to let him work a few shifts on the night shift, and on the night of the 24th went in to do company work. The night boss told him to start brushing between the two last rooms on the third northeast entry, and at 11:45 p. m. Arthur Green, the night-shift driver, went in to get his car, which was loaded with rook, and at that time he stated to the driver that he would have to go to the bottom and sharpen some picks. No one saw him from that time until Alfred Spiers, the fire boss, in going his rounds of the mine at 2 o’clock in the morning went down the entry to see how he was getting along. He found him lying dead under a rock 3×4 feet, 10 inches thick. He had been cutting with his pick along the left side of the roadway, and on the right side a slip ran through the rock, and when about five inches of cutting had been done on the left side another slip started running to the right, which loosened the rock, and it must have fallen without warning. He left a widow and five children. ((died 1896)) ((Fifteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1896, Containing the Thirteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1897))

James Nisanatto

Oct 2, 1901, James Nisanatto, miner, age 30 years, married, was instantly killed by a fall of rock in his roadway, about 8 feet from the face, in the Carbon Hill mine No. 3 mine of the Star Coal company, Grundy county. He was pulling an empty car into his place, when a rock suddenly fell on him, with the result as stated. He leaves a widow and one child. ((Twenty-First Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1902, Also the Fourth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1903))

Frank Novac

March 10, 1904, Frank Novac, miner, aged 46 years, married, was killed instantly by a fall of rock, at the face of his working place in Taylor & Cavanaugh’s No. 5 mine, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased after firing a shot immediately returned to observe the effects when a large rock fell on him with the result as stated. He leaves a widow and six children. ((Twenty-Third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904, Also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1905))

Louis Olson

November 2, 1900, Louis Olson, miner, aged 36 years, married, was injured by a fall of rock at the face of his room in No. 5 mine of the Braceville Coal Company, Grundy county. Deceased was taking down coal at the time, when a piece of rock fell from the roof, striking him on the head and back; he lingered until March 1, 1901, when he died from the effects of his injuries. He leaves a widow and three children, all dependent. ((Twentieth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1901, Also the Third Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1902))

Louis Phillips

August 26, 1906, Louis Phillips, roadman, aged 48 years, married, was severely crushed by falling rock on the main west entry, 450 feet from the working face, in the C. W. & V. Coal Company’s No. 2 mine, South Wilmington, Grundy county. Deceased and his son were working nights, cleaning the haulage road, when a rock fell from the roof striking deceased on the head. He was conveyed to his home, where he died three hours after the accident. He leaves a widow and eight children. ((Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907, Also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1908))

Anton Planety

Nov 19, 1901, Anton Planety, miner, age 55 years, married, was instantly killed at the face of his working place in No. 5 mine of the Wilmington Star Mining company, Coal City, Grundy county. He was taking down coal, when a rock fell on him, which caused his death. He leaves a widow and nine children. ((Twenty-First Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1902, Also the Fourth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1903))

Jonathan Postle

January 6, 1900, Jonathan Postle, miner, aged 62 years, was fatally injured by a fall of coal in the Braceville Coal Co.’s No. 4 mine, at Braceville, Grundy county. Deceased was at work in his room, and was taking down loose coal, when it came away suddenly, and caught him between a prop and the coal, breaking three of his ribs and injuring him internally, from which he died February 1st, twenty-five days after the accident occurred. Deceased leaves a widow and one child. ((Nineteenth Annual Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1900, Also the Second Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1901))

Joseph Prazek

September 17, 1906, Joseph Prazek, miner, aged 34 years, married, was instantly killed by falling rock at the face of his working room in the Big Four-Wilmington Coal Company’s No. 6 mine, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. He leaves a widow and four children. ((Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907, Also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1908))

John Prouchio

February 12, 1906, John Prouchio, miner, aged 43 years, married, was instantly killed by falling rock on his road head in the No. 5 mine of the Big Four Wilmington Coal Company, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased was loading a car, when the rock fell without warning, with the result as stated. He leaves a widow and four children. ((Twenty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1906, Also the Eighth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1907))

Oscar Queker

On Sunday evening, September 30, 1894, at the Big Four Company’s No. 2 mine, Coal City, Oscar Queker, a lad of sixteen years, was instantly killed by a fall of rock. He and his step-father, Ernest Klein, were working together making a mule stable near the bottom of the shaft. This was being done by taking a skip off the pillar alongside of a cross entry where the slate had been brushed four feet high above the coal. The coal had been taken out and the slate had been supported by props in order to make it safe; they had just commenced to take down the stone, and instead of doing this work in a safe manner they removed the props supporting the stone alongside of the entry, and then proceeded to cut the stone on the rib. The boy was inside cutting to meet his step-father, who was cutting from the outside. The fire-boss, James McCullough, saw the boy at work under the stone and warned them of the danger, telling them to set props to secure themselves, and they laughed at him and said it was all right, but shortly afterward a block of stone weighing about four tons fell on the boy, causing instant death. This accident may be attributed to gross carelessness or incompetency on the part of the boy’s step-father. Residence: Coal City. ((Fourteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1895, Containing the Twelfth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A. Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Ed. F. Hartman, State Printer; 1896))

John Rifflern

May 31, 1900, John Rifflern, aged 21 years, single, employed as a miner in the Wilmington Star Coal Co.’s No. 5 mine, at Coal City, Grundy county, was instantly killed by a fall of rock at the face of his room. Deceased was cutting the left side of the brushing, where a cutter or slip was running parallel with the road, and one on the right side of the roadway, sloping upwards to the left side. As soon as he cut through to the break, he thus relieved the stone, which fell on him, causing his death. ((Nineteenth Annual Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1900, Also the Second Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1901))

John Roberts

January 8, 1901, John Roberts, timberman, married, aged 40 years, was instantly killed by a fall of rock in No. 5 mine of the Wilmington Coal Mining and Manufacturing Company, Grundy county. This is a new mine; the men were employed taking up bottom and timbering the byways around the bottom of the shaft; they had drilled a bottom whole which was collecting a considerable quantity of water. Deceased went to where they were constructing the mule stable to get a blasting barrel; just as he entered a great mass of rock fell, crushing him under it. This was his first day working in this mine. He leaves a widow and two children. ((Twentieth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1901, Also the Third Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1902))

John Robinson

September 16, 1898 – John Robinson, a miner, aged 49 years, married, was fatally injured by a fall of rock at the face of his room in the Star Coal Company’s mine No. 3, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased had cut up one side of the brushing and entered a wedge over the top, intending to take it down, but, it being quitting time, he went home, intending to take it down in the morning. However, he neglected to do so, and commenced to load coal without examining the rock. About 10 a.m. the rock fell on him, crushing him so that he died about 3 p.m. He leaves a widow and six children, of whom two are dependent. This accident was due to his own negligence. With proper care in taking the rock down, or putting a prop under it, the accident would have been avoided. ((Prepared by the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1899, Also Containing the First Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1899))

Joseph Rolando

December 21, 1893, Joseph Rolando, a miner, aged 40 years, single, was fatally injured in the No. 4 shaft of the Wilmington, Mining and Manufacturing Co., at Diamond. While setting a prop in his road-head, under a loose rock, it fell striking him on the head, producing two scalp wounds, which, at the time, were not considered serious. He was able walk around for a day or so, but died the third day after the accident occurred, being suddenly seized with tetanus. Residence: Diamond. ((Thirteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1894, Containing the Eleventh Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A. Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Ed. F. Hartman, State Printer; 1895))

Seb. Romagnolis

Sept 16, 1903, Seb. Romagnolis, miner, aged 19 years, single, was killed instantly by falling down the shaft at the Chicago, Wilmington & Vermillion Coal company No. 1 mine, South Wilmington, Grundy county. Deceased with three other men were on the cage coming out of the shaft; when about 30 feet from the lower landing, deceased let loose of the handle bar, turning round, presumably to get off at the lower landing, when he fell to one side of the shaft, the cage passing him, he fell to the bottom, a distance of 165 feet. ((Twenty-Third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904, Also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1905))

Peter Rossetta

June 18, 1896, Peter Rossetta, miner, aged 36 years, was instantly killed by falling rock in longwall working place in the Diamond No. 4 mine of the Wilmington Mining and Manufacturing Company, in Grundy county. The mine was not in operation this day, but the deceased and his partner had gone in to get coal loose for the next day’s work. He had taken the coal down on the left side of the roadway for a distance of ten feet along the face of the room; several breaks were in the roof and came together at this point. It is supposed that the deceased was in the act of putting in a prop to the roof where the two breaks met, which was the light end of the rock, when, without any warning, a large piece of rock, 9 ft. 6 in. x 3 ft. 2 in., fell on him, completely covering him; his partner then went some distance and secured help to remove the rock, but it was found that he was dead. Had the prop been put in five feet from the point towards the road, the rock could ___ have fallen. He left a widow and five children in the old country. ((Fifteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1896, Containing the Thirteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1897))

John Rosso

June 29, 1907, John Rosso, miner, aged 39 years, married, was killed instantly by falling coal, at the face of his working place in the No. 6 mine of the Big Four Wilmington Coal Co., Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased leaves a widow and five children. ((Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907, Also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1908))

Ambrodjio Salvitto

March 25, 1901, Ambrodjio Salvitto, miner, aged 27 years, single, was killed by a fall of rock at the face of his room in No. 1 mine of the Star Coal Company, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased was opening up his place on the left hand side, which had been closed for several days; he was throwing out coal, when a large rock suddenly fell on him, causing his death. His place was insufficiently propped, the props being about six feet back from the face. There were plenty of props at hand. ((Twentieth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1901, Also the Third Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1902))

William Scurrah

On May 3, 1895, at Braceville Coal Company’s No. 4 mine, William Scurrah, miner, aged 47, was fatally injured by a fall of rock while he was brushing on his road about 30 yards from the face. He had been wedging down a piece of stone off the side of his road and was stooping down to pick up a wedge when a rock weighing over half a ton fell on him, crushing him along his back, making a number of contusions. The doctor said he thought some blood vessel had been broken, and that caused his death. He lived about eight hours after the accident. He leaves a widow and one boy, about 14 years of age, who is a cripple. The stone was supposed to be good, so his partners testified, and probably in wedging down the piece of stone he had loosened the one that fell on him. Residence: Braceville. ((Fourteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1895, Containing the Twelfth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A. Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Ed. F. Hartman, State Printer; 1896))

Paul Segia

Oct 8, 1903, Paul Segia, miner, aged 28 years, single, was injured by a fall of rock, in his roadhead; he died Feb 24, 1904, four and one half months after receiving the injuries. ((Twenty-Third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904, Also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1905))

Edward Seltzer

April 3, 1894, Edward Seltzer, topman, aged 28 years, single, was killed by falling down the No. 1 shaft of the Star Coal Co., at Carbon Hill. The company had put in a new cage; one of the lifting gates at the lower landing had been removed to make some changes. In putting it back, it was found that one of the sliding rods had been left out of the eye-bolt. The deceased had climbed up to put the rod in place, and returning to the landing he attempted to jump, but in doing so stumbled and fell backwards into the shaft a distance of 104 feet. Residence: Carbon Hill. ((Thirteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1894, Containing the Eleventh Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A. Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Ed. F. Hartman, State Printer; 1895))

Anton Sgro

December 9, 1904, Anton Sgro, miner, aged 30 years, single, was killed instantly by falling down the No. 1 shaft of the C. W. & V. Coal Co., South Wilmington, Grundy county. The accident occurred about 6:45 a.m. The engineer was letting down the men, nine in number, they getting on the cage at the lower landing; when they were down about 30 feet the engineer suddenly reversed the engine, hoisting them to the top at a very high speed; the cage being self dumping the men were thrown out at the top; unfortunately one fell down the shaft, the other eight were more or less injured. ((Twenty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1905, Also the Seventh Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers; 1906))

William Sims

May 14, 1900, William Sims, miner, aged 50 years, married, was instantly killed by a fall of rock at the face of his room in the Diamond No. 4 mine of the Wilmington Mining & Manufacturing Company, Grundy county. Deceased was getting the loose coal from the right side of his room, preparatory to setting props, when, without any warning, a large rock fell and killed him; there was a slip in the roof, sloping upwards to a break at the face, thus releasing the stone. Deceased leaves a widow and two children. ((Nineteenth Annual Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1900, Also the Second Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1901))

Frank Slipicka

March 17, 1906, Frank Slipicka, miner, aged 17 years, single, was killed instantly by falling rock at the face of his working place, in the No. 6 mine of the Braceville Coal Company, Braceville, Grundy county. Deceased neglected to properly secure his place with props; he was throwing coal out from the right hand side of his roadway, when the rock fell with the result as stated. ((Twenty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1906, Also the Eighth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1907))

James Sumerville

On October 13, 1895, at the Wilmington Star Mining Company, No. 3 mine, Coal City, James Sumerville, engineer at the mine, was caught in the belting that run the grind stone and was taken around the shaft and pounded to a pulp. It seems that he had been grinding a knife used for splitting cap pieces, and it is supposed he had attempted to push the belt off with his foot (which was sometimes carelessly practiced) and became entangled with the belting and thus met his death. No one saw it happen, and he had been dead some time when found, as he was quite cold. He left a widow and four small children. He was 35 years of age. ((Fifteenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Coal in Illinois, 1896, Containing the Thirteenth Annual Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines; George A Schilling, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1897))

Mateo Treaso

Jan 4, 1904, Mateo Treaso, miner, aged 42 years, married, was fatally injured at the face of his working place by a fall of rock, in Taylor & Cavanaugh’s No. 5 mine, Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased was coming down grade with a loaded trip and was sitting on the front end of the car, when his head struck against the roof breaking his neck; he died the following day. He leaves a widow and one child. ((Twenty-Third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904, Also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1905))

John Wendel

December 31, 1904, John Wendel, miner, age 24 years, single, was severely injured by a fall of rock on his roadway, 45 feet from the face of his working place in the No. 5 mine of the Braceville Coal Company, Braceville, Grundy county. Deceased had quit work about 3:00 o’clock p.m., and was going out when a large rock fell on him. He was conveyed to his home where he had died about 6 o’clock the same day. ((Twenty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1905, Also the Seventh Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers; 1906))

Edward Wheelwright

January 16, 1899 – Edward Wheelwright, miner, aged 60 years, single, was fatally injured by a fall of rock in his roadway about thirty feet from the face of his room in the Star Coal Company’s No. 2 mine at Carbon Hill, Grundy county. Deceased was eating dinner at the time of the accident. A piece of rock fell on him, breaking one of his legs and seriously injuring him about the back. He died two days after receiving his injuries. ((Prepared by the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1899, Also Containing the First Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros, State Printers; 1899))

Thomas R Williams

September 19, 1906, Thomas R Williams, miner, aged 50 years, married, was fatally injured by falling rock on his road head in the Braceville Coal Company’s No. 6 mine, Braceville, Grundy county. He died two hours after the accident, leaving a widow and four children. ((Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907, Also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices; David Ross, Secretary. Springfield, ILL: Phillips Bros., State Printers; 1908))

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